Category: FL Bail Restrictions

What to Do If You Have an Outstanding Warrant

If you think you have an outstanding warrant for your arrest, then you need to act fast. If you do not, you will most likely find yourself in jail. Unfortunately, the warrant will not go away simply because you want it to. You could find yourself being arrested at work, home, or during a routine traffic stop, as well as in front of your children or parents. This is the last thing you want to happen. To prevent this from occurring, here are three things you need to do now. 

How is Your Privacy Protected?

Most people do not want anyone to know if they have been arrested. Let’s face it, it is embarrassing, and in some instances, could ruin your reputation. Therefore, you most likely want to keep it on the down low since it could affect your career and personal life. 

Active Arrest Warrant

An arrest warrant is issued by a judge which authorizes the arrest and detention of an individual or the search and seizure of an individual’s property. Arrest warrants serve the purpose of protecting people from unlawful arrests under the Fourth Amendment. It gives notice to the person being arrested about the charges pressed against them. 

Helpful tips to Finding the Right Attorney

It is very important to have a great attorney when you’re in the midst of facing any criminal charges. Not all attorneys are the same and finding the right attorney for your needs can make all the difference! The hunt for a good attorney can be overwhelming, especially with so many to choose from; however, here are some helpful tips to find the right attorney for you:

Why the Right To Remain Silent Is Best

When you are arrested, the best thing that you can do for yourself is to keep quiet until you are represented by an attorney. It is important to remember that if you are arrested, you have the right to remain silent and the right to an attorney but these rights only protect you if you choose to use them.

Rescheduling Court Appearances

An important part of being out on bail is making sure a person does not miss any scheduled court hearings. Missing a court hearing can result in being arrested again and having to pay the full amount of bail. Once a person misses their court date, a judge will issue a warrant for an arrest. This allows a police officer to make an arrest and can keep a person in jail until they can resolve why they missed their court date.

The Conditions of Probation

When a person is convicted of a crime and goes before a judge, they may be granted probation before being sentenced to jail time. Depending on the severity of the offense a judge may grant probation to a defendant instead of sending them directly to jail. Probation is a court-ordered period of supervision served in the community. It allows for a person to remain in the community while having to comply with certain conditions. When a judge agrees to grant probation instead of prison time, the defendant has a list of conditions that must be met in order to remain out of jail. Failure to comply with probation conditions can result in additional jail time.

Your Rights After Being Arrested

When you’ve been arrested it can be confusing and hard to understand. It is important to know your rights so that you can avoid any further complications. Police officers are required to read a person their Miranda Rights. I’m sure you’ve heard them read on TV before “Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an Attorney. If you cannot afford an Attorney, one will be provided for you”. You do have the right to waive these rights but it’s best to first understand what they are and their importance.

Do’s & Don’ts While Out on Bail

If you or family member ever find yourself in the situation where you are out on a bail, there are some things to avoid and some things to consider to be sure that you remain out of jail until your final court date. Click here for helpful tips.

When Can Bail Be Denied?

There are certain circumstances in which a judge will not grant a defendant bail. One obvious reason would be if the defendant has previously breached the conditions of bail, making them less likely to be granted bail again.